Russian climber Vadim Timonov climbing boulder problem

Vadim Timonov on the First Ascent of Backflip Sit (8C+/9A)

The Russian powerhouse delves into the next-level project and what it’s like to climb in the Djan-Tugan region

Tenaya athlete Vadim Timonov has dedicated three trips to the area to explore and establish new lines. Yet his main goal, he says, was a boulder close to the entrance, which largely went ignored because of its position and difficulty. The Backflip project.

Climber Jimmy Webb bouldering in Switzerland

The Explorer: Jimmy Webb

Live interview with Jimmy Webb on bouldering development, long-term projects, and traveling the world to climb.

Jimmy Webb tends to keep a low profile, but the humble warrior has sent more V16s [8C+] than almost any other American.

Rock climber Drew Ruana

The Tactician: Drew Ruana

The 21-year-old climber on his next-level mega proj, the projecting process, and how to boulder at your limit.

Climbing at your limit requires much more than pure strength, or power, or even technique. It takes a process.

Alizee-Dufraisse-Seasons

Seasons: Alizée Dufraisse

Motivation is ephemeral, fleeting, like the passing seasons.

Motivation is ephemeral, fleeting, like the passing seasons. “The important thing is to be here, to enjoy, to learn, knowing that you are where you want to be,” says Alizée Dufraisse. As her life and …

Read moreSeasons: Alizée Dufraisse

Vadim Timonov bouldering in Switzerland

Vadim Timonov in Switzerland

Bagging one 8C/V15 would be a proud feat for anyone, but four in a month? That’s just nuts.

This was the longest journey of my life. From my house in Saint Petersburg, Russia, I drove 2,500 km (1,500 miles) to Ticino, Switzerland…

Drew Ruana sets up for the crux of Sleepwalker (V16/8C+), Red Rock Canyon, Nevada. Photo: Cameron Hörst.

Sending Sleepwalker

Tenaya athlete Drew Ruana on his first V16 ascent in Red Rock Canyon, Nevada.

As the days went by, my skin degraded—getting softer, thrashed. The combination of Red Rock, Nevada’s dry desert air and abrasive sandstone grated off layer after layer until little was left.